Browse Tag by charcoal
Matter and energy

Utilization of Coconuts

Charcoal briquette

Indonesia is an important producer of coconuts in the world.  Despite the mass production of coconuts, application of the coconut is still generally limited to the fruit of copra, and coconut oil for home use. Other by-products such as coconut shells are usually treated as wastes and not fully utilized. Indeed, the weight of the shell reaches 12% of the weight of the coconuts. With this, we can see a big potential of such a large shell production for productive activities that can increase the value added.

One of the products made from coconut shell is the coconut charcoal briquettes. These are very green products because no trees are cut down and the waste that would otherwise be thrown away is now processed to be sustainable natural resources. Amazingly, compared to other conventional charcoal made by wood or coal, coconut charcoal briquettes have distinctive advantages, which make them more popular in the world market.

Among these, coconut charcoal burns hotter and longer that makes it especially perfect for slow grilling. There’s no added chemical on the charcoal, so everyone gets a clean burn. It is more like grilling with real wood rather than charcoal briquettes. The smell of the charcoal is rather neutral other than just having a grilling smoke smell with the foods.

Coconut charcoal briquettes are also reusable. When finished grilling the meal, the remaining charcoal can be used as a bottom or base for the next grill out. The coconut charcoal definitely has staying power.

Availability may be an issue in some areas, but it will never be the problem in Indonesia.

Ecosystems

A Survival Water Filter – Part 2

Dirty-Water-to-Clean-Water-2

The third and most important item is the charcoal. This is the part of the filter that removes the most impurities from the water. In order to get charcoal in the wild, you must make it yourself. The first step in making charcoal is building a fire. Once you have your fire, put one large log on the fire and wait until the log is totally burned but has not turned into ash. Using another stick, take the burn pieces of charcoal off of the log. Keep these pieces safe until the building process.

The next materials include stones and gravel. If you are in an area that does not have sand, then do not waste your time looking for it because it is not the most important part of the filter. You only need about a handful off each of these materials. The last material is a type of cloth. Although it is not found in the wild, cloth may be the easiest item to retrieve on this list.

After collecting the materials, we can start build the filter. It is actually very simple and easy. The first thing that you should do is roll the bark into a cone and use your knife to poke a hole through the overlapping part. String the leaf or branch that you picked earlier through the hole and tie off the end using a square knot.

Now, take your pieces of charcoal and put them in the center of the piece of cloth you have. Now bring all the corners of the cloth together so the charcoal sits in the bottom. Now, covering the charcoal, use your hand to smash it into a powder. Put the part with charcoal into the cone and spread out the corners so you can see the charcoal.

Pile on the gravel and then the rocks and your filter is set to go.

After that, boil the water For purification. We will need an area where clay is under the soil. We will use the clay to line the hole in the ground so that no water leaks into the earth. This is pretty simple, dig two holes, one for boiling and one to get clay. Take the clay and add a little bit of water to it so you can apply it to the hole. Seal off all the dirt. Now you can pour water into it and get your fire going along side it. You will need to find dry rocks to do this. Put a few rocks in the fire and once they have been in the fire for a while, you can put them into your water using another two sticks. You know its boiling when its bubbling.

Now you know how to put together a water filter in the wild. But this method for water purification is for SURVIVAL CONDITIONS ONLY, and it is not the best method of purifying water if you are near civilization. During “normal” times, find and install a qualified water filter for your drinking water.

Matter and energy

A Wonderful BBQ Wedding

bbq wedding

My high school best friend was getting married in Italy. She hosted a BBQ wedding on a piece of big grassland. Honestly, I wasn’t really interested in joining the party at the beginning as it took me 12 hours to land there. But turned out this trip and the party were so much wonderful.

The BBQ party was the highlight of the wedding and it started at evening. The fuel they used was coconut shell charcoal instead of gas or coal. This reflected the couple as Earth lovers and the wedding theme as natural. One of the benefits using coconut shell charcoal is that there’s no smoke. Guests could chat and socialise easily without being “covered” by the smoke.

Because of the consistent heat for over four hours using coconut charcoal made it a very a convenient method of barbecuing (and also economical). There’s no need for anyone to replenish the grill with more fuel during cooking.  After the party, there was little ash produced that allowed us to clean grill a lot easier after barbecuing.

This really inspired me and I tried to use the same fuel for barbecuing with my kids after going home. Well, I can say, coconut charcoal is definitely one of the cleanest and cheapest ways of enjoying a grilling meal. It’s really something which should be given a thought as once you switch to coconut charcoal you won’t feel like trying another fuel for your grill. There’s no health risk, which is my particular concern for the kids, and the meat tastes just as it is. I even find it amazing as there’s no interruption in the middle to refuel my BBQ.

Earth

Charcoal Grill. Gas grill. Which one is Earth Lover?

Charcoal-Briquttes

Summer is coming soon. Many of us are ready for a little fire cooking. You may consider what fuel to grill: gas or charcoal? The question is not simply which produces a tastier burger, but which is better for the planet? If you want to do it in the greenest way, the step 1 is to choose the greenest fuel.

The straight part of the issue is that the briquettes emit more carbon dioxide when they’re burned. So if you’re only concerned with the carbon dioxide that comes out from your grill, then gas is the easy choice.

But let’s step back. Consider the whole production cycle. There are certain types of charcoal deserve to be the greener cooking fuel. The trick behind is to select the charcoal that’s been produced with sustainability. Gas emits less carbon dioxide, but is made from non-renewable fossil fuels. While charcoal sounds dirtier at the first glance, but can come from renewable resources such as trees, so it is actually carbon neutral in the end. Gas, on the other hand, can’t be replenished – or at least not for the millions of years.

On top of that, briquettes are made primarily from plant waste, which would otherwise be thrown away. So, it’s not as if we’re cutting down trees just to make briquettes – they are, instead, smart and green products!

OK. It’s time to prepare the barbecue. I will grill the best not only for my stomach, but also for the Earth. How about you?