Browse Tag by air pollution
Life

How To Improve Poor Indoor Air at Work In 5 Ways

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While the worldwide pandemic may have brought attention to the role pollutants play in the transmission of airborne viruses, we still confront an indoor air safety and health problem for which there is no cure, only prevention – indoor air pollution. 

For decades, poor indoor air quality has been a problem in the workplace, posing a variety of health concerns. Office air that is constantly recycled and filled with particles, germs, and hazardous gases has been shown to impact mood, productivity, and job performance. Here’s how you can guarantee that your workplace’s indoor air quality is maintained.

1. Avoid inducing respiratory problems. 

It is in the best interests of the company to limit employee exposure to anything that might endanger their respiratory system. Tobacco smoke and dust from sweeping or vacuuming might aggravate underlying respiratory or allergy problems. Emissions from old materials, and furnishings can account for up to 30% of total volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aggravating allergies and respiratory problems in office employees and contributing to Sick Building Syndrome (SBS). 

2. Keep things tidy. 

You can prevent the build-up of allergens and bioaerosols from coughing, speaking, or sneezing that contaminate surfaces and cause disease by keeping surfaces clean. To keep dust and bacteria at bay, wipe down desks and communal surfaces with a wet cloth on a regular basis. Offices with carpets, which can emit aldehydes and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), might worsen respiratory problems and reduce productivity. To guarantee allergens and dust are effectively eliminated, clean carpets twice a week using a vacuum with a HEPA filter. 

3. Separate your office equipment. 

Indoor air pollutants such as particulate matter, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and ozone are all linked to SBS symptoms such as fatigue, headaches, and a tight chest5. Printers, photocopiers, and all-in-one office machines are known to emit indoor air pollutants such as particulate matter, VOCs, and ozone, which are all linked to SBS symptoms such as fatigue, headaches, and a tight chest. Boost ventilation to enhance circulation and increase hourly room air exchanges, and keep machinery separate from workers in its own room or designated area if practical. 

4. Colds and flu should not be taken lightly. 

Because of the increased possibility for contact between healthy and ill people in shared workplace spaces, viral infections spread quickly through contact with infected persons or contaminated objects. According to studies, employees who work in open-plan workplaces with more than six people miss 62 percent more days. Businesses can minimize the likelihood of illness-related absenteeism by creating a good work culture and implementing sick leave rules that safeguard employees’ health and safety while also reducing “presenteeism” (the phenomena in which unwell employees still come to work). 

5. Take into account indoor air quality technologies. 

Inside, harmful quantities of indoor air pollution can enter through old HVAC systems, which can produce VOCs and harbour fungus colonies. 

8 Other indoor pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and ultrafine particulate matter, can have greater negative long-term impacts on productivity and health. To safeguard employees’ physical health as well as their performance, comfort, and quality of life, treating the air requires specialist technology capable of sustaining high levels of indoor air quality at work. 

As the hazards of indoor air pollution become more widely recognized, the day will come when the quality of indoor air in workplaces and workstations will be formally controlled. Businesses, on the other hand, may now get ahead of the competition by investing in indoor air safety technologies. Employees will feel confident that their health and welfare is respected if the company openly commits to clean air and provides a safe working environment, and the company will have an obvious advantage when recruiting fresh talent. 

Life

What Are Possible Sources of Indoor Air Pollution?

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Nobody wants to breathe polluted air, but they have no idea that the air they breathed in inside their home are contaminated to many pollutants. It is sad to be true, but the indoor air quality is 10 times worse than the outdoor air quality. 

Since we spent 80% of our times indoor, there is a high chance that we breathed polluted air every day and infected our lung with pollutants that can impact to our health. 

Common Indoor Air Pollutants 

1. Particulates 

If you use alternative heating coal such as wood stove, then you are exposed to the smoke particulates every day. The particulates in the smoke can fly in the air and inhaled to your lungs. It can absorb to your lung and damaging it. 

2. Tobacco 

If you are a smoker or live with a smoker, chances of compounds and chemicals in your indoor air are heavily high. The only solution to avoid this is to make your home smoke-free and do not let anyone smoke inside your house. 

3. Volatiles 

You may not know about this, but, your cleaning products, hairsprays, paints, fabrics are the sources of volatile organic compounds. You can reduce the uses of hairsprays to protect yourself from the exposure of pollutants. 

 

These indoor air pollutants are dangerous to our health. You can protect yourself and your family by cleaning-up your house regularly, let the window open to circulate the air or installing an air purifier in your living room or your bedroom to keep your indoor air fresh. 

 

Life

5 Smart Ways to Improve Indoor Air Quality

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Indoor Air Pollution 

Did you know that the indoor air quality is 10 times worse than the outdoor air quality? Yes, the air that you breathe in your home is as bad – or even worse than it is outdoors.  To make it worse, 80% of our time are spent in indoor area which makes us breathe pollute air every day 

What is exactly air pollution? 

According to the British Lung Foundation defines indoor air pollution as “dust, dirt or gases in the air inside a building that harms us if we breathe it in”. 

It means that without us knowing, the indoor air is contained so many dust, gases, bacteria and other pollutants in the airborne. The World Health Organization (WHO) said, the indoor air pollution killed a staggering 4.3 million people worldwide in 2012, of which 99,000 people were in Europe suffering from serious respiratory and cardiovascular conditions such as lung cancer and heart disease. 

But there are still ways for us to breathe cleaner and fresher air.  

5 Smart Ways to Improve Indoor Air Quality 

  • Clean your house regularly 
    Clean your house, carpets and sofas regularly can reduce the level of pollutants in your home or your office. So, make sure to clean it up regularly or hire a professional to clean it up for you.
  • Make your home smoke-free zone 
    If you are a smoker, then you should hold yourself a bit to not smoke cigarettes inside your house. Why? Cigarettes contain more than 4,000 chemicals and the smoke and odour of your cigarettes can pollute your air.  It would be better if you stop smoking, or smoke outside your house and do not let anyone smoke inside your house. 
  • Use Cooking Vents 
    Gas stoves release harmful contaminants, including carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide. Which is why, you need to install a kitchen vents to remove and filter out the air to improve indoor air quality. 
  • Buy indoor plants 
    Plants are nature’s natural air filters. Besides, investing indoor plants can boost your mood by looking at the green fresh leaves. 
  • Invest in an air purifier 
    Yes, an air purifier is great to trap and remove almost 100% of pollutants, bacteria and viruses, filtering it and releasing it back out into the room with cleaner and fresher air.
    It is highly recommended tools to improve your indoor air quality. 
Oceans

Air pollution from China make stronger Pacific storms

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Air pollution is now the world’s biggest environmental health risk with 7 million deaths per year. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), its effects can reach far beyond your heart and lungs. According to a new paper published by researchers at the California Institute of Technology, air. This causes clouds to grow denser, resulting in more intense storms above the ocean.

Since the Pacific storm track is an important component in the global general circulation, the impacts of Asian pollution on the storm track tend to affect the weather patterns of other parts of the world during the wintertime, especially a downstream region [of the track] like North America.